Fellows

Becoming a Fellow of the Obesity Medicine Association (FOMA) is one of the highest honors bestowed upon members who demonstrate dedication and commitment to the clinical treatment of obesity and obesity-related diseases.

The following candidates met a list of criteria to become Fellows of OMA. They earned their Fellow designation, FOMA, which identifies them as someone who is passionate about the field and continues to seek new ways to treat obesity effectively. Want to become a Fellow too? See if you meet the requirements.

  • Deborah Bade Horn, DO, MPH, MFOMA
  • Denise E. Bruner, MD, MFOMA
  • David Bryman, DO, MFOMA
  • Ed Hendricks, MD, MFOMA
  • Allen Rader, MD, MFOMA
  • Larry Richardson, MD, MFOMA
  • Eneida Roldan, MD, MPH, MBA, MFOMA
  • G. Michael Steelman, MD, MFOMA
  • Eric C. Westman, MD, MHS, MFOMA
  • Gary Zisk, DO, MFOMA
  • Lydia Alexander, MD, FOMA
  • Harold Bays, MD, FTOS, FACC, FACE, FNLA, FOMA
  • Gurpreet Boparai, MD, FOMA
  • Erin Chamberlin, MD, FAAFP, FOMA
  • Sandra Christensen, MSN, ARNP, FOMA
  • Suzanne Cuda, MD, FAAP, FOMA
  • Krishna Doniparthi, MD, FAARM, FOMA
  • U. Inge Fergsuon, DO, FACOI, FOMA
  • Angela Fitch, MD, FACP, FOMA
  • Michelle Freshwater, MD, FOMA
  • Brent Gear, DO, FACEP, FACOEP, FOMA
  • Frank Greenway, MD, FOMA
  • Sarah Hallberg, DO, MS, FOMA
  • Robert Huster, MD, FACOG, FOMA
  • Susan Isensee, MD, FAAFP, FOMA
  • Michelle A. Kennedy, NP-C, FOMA
  • Carl Knopke, MD, FOMA
  • Scot Kolsin, MD, FOMA
  • Cesar Lara, MD, FOMA
  • Ethan Lazarus, MD, FOMA
  • Richard Lindquist, MD, FAASP, FOMA
  • Pamela Lyon, MD, FACEP, FOMA
  • William McCarthy, MD, FOMA
  • Jeremy McConnell, MD, FOMA
  • Julia Melamed, MD, FOMA
  • Daisy Merey, MD, PhD, FAAFP, FOMA
  • Doris Munoz-Mantilla, MD, FOMA
  • Derek Muse, MD, FOMA
  • Joynita Nicholson, DO, FOMA
  • Nicholas Pennings, DO, FOMA
  • Warren Peters, MD, MPH, FOMA
  • Craig Primack, MD, FACP, FAAP, FOMA
  • Justin Puckett, DO, FOMA
  • Vivienne Rose, MD, FOMA
  • Wendy Scinta, MD, MS, FOMA
  • Jennifer Seger, MD, FOMA
  • Bharti Shetye, MD, FOMA
  • Jeffrey Sicat, MD, FACE, FOMA
  • Wickham Simonds, MD, FOMA
  • Verlyn Warrington, MD, FOMA
  • Deborah Bade Horn, DO, MPH, MFOMA

    Deborah Bade Horn, DO, MPH, MFOMA

    Became a Master Fellow in 2015
    Master Fellow of OMA (MFOMA) is an honorary designation bestowed upon members whose contributions have exceeded those of a traditional member and whose leadership within the organization has elevated both the association and the field of obesity medicine.

    Dr. Horn is a past president of the association and the current chairman of the Board of Trustees. She is a founding partner of the Obesity Medicine Education Collaborative and a regular presenter and thought leader at OMA conferences. Dr. Horn is the recipient of the Dr. Raymond E. Dietz Meritorious Service Award in 2014 and the Obesity Medicine Clinician of the Year Award in 2011.

  • Denise E. Bruner, MD, MFOMA

    Denise E. Bruner, MD, MFOMA

    Became a Master Fellow in 2015
    Master Fellow of OMA (MFOMA) is an honorary designation bestowed upon members whose contributions have exceeded those of a traditional member and whose leadership within the organization has elevated both the association and the field of obesity medicine.

    Dr. Bruner is a past president of the association. She is the recipient of the Dr. Raymond E. Dietz Meritorious Service Award in 1994, the Dr. Vernon B. Astler Award in 2007, and the Obesity Medicine Clinician of the Year Award in 1998.

  • David Bryman, DO, MFOMA

    David Bryman, DO, MFOMA

    Became a Master Fellow in 2015
    Master Fellow of OMA (MFOMA) is an honorary designation bestowed upon members whose contributions have exceeded those of a traditional member and whose leadership within the organization has elevated both the association and the field of obesity medicine.

    Dr. Bryman is a past president of the association. He is the recipient of the Dr. Vernon B. Astler Award in 2010, the Steelman-Seim Educator Award for Excellence in Academics in 2011, and the Obesity Medicine Clinician of the Year Award in 2008.

  • Ed Hendricks, MD, MFOMA

    Ed Hendricks, MD, MFOMA

    Became a Master Fellow in 2015
    Master Fellow of OMA (MFOMA) is an honorary designation bestowed upon members whose contributions have exceeded those of a traditional member and whose leadership within the organization has elevated both the association and the field of obesity medicine.

    Dr. Hendricks is a founder and past president of the Obesity Treatment Foundation (OTF) and the current ex officio of the OTF's Board of Directors. He is the recipient of the OTF's Distinguished Achievement Award in 2017, the Dr. Raymond E. Dietz Meritorious Service Award in 2013, the Dr. Vernon B. Astler Award in 2011, and the Obesity Medicine Clinician of the Year Award in 2009.

  • Allen Rader, MD, MFOMA

    Allen Rader, MD, MFOMA

    Became a Master Fellow in 2015
    Master Fellow of OMA (MFOMA) is an honorary designation bestowed upon members whose contributions have exceeded those of a traditional member and whose leadership within the organization has elevated both the association and the field of obesity medicine.

    Dr. Rader is the recipient of the Obesity Medicine Clinician of the Year Award in 2007. He is also a regular presenter during OMA conferences and a topic expert and thought leader in obesity medicine.

  • Larry Richardson, MD, MFOMA

    Larry Richardson, MD, MFOMA

    Became a Master Fellow in 2015
    Master Fellow of OMA (MFOMA) is an honorary designation bestowed upon members whose contributions have exceeded those of a traditional member and whose leadership within the organization has elevated both the association and the field of obesity medicine.

    Dr. Richardson is a past president of the association and a current trustee on the Board of Trustees. He is the recipient of the Dr. Raymond E. Dietz Meritorious Service Award in 2010 and the Obesity Medicine Clinician of the Year Award in 1996.

  • Eneida Roldan, MD, MPH, MBA, MFOMA

    Eneida Roldan, MD, MPH, MBA, MFOMA

    Became a Master Fellow in 2015
    Master Fellow of OMA (MFOMA) is an honorary designation bestowed upon members whose contributions have exceeded those of a traditional member and whose leadership within the organization has elevated both the association and the field of obesity medicine.

    Dr. Roldan is a recipient of the Dr. Raymond E. Dietz Meritorious Service Award in 2003 and the Obesity Medicine Clinician of the Year Award in 2000.

  • G. Michael Steelman, MD, MFOMA

    G. Michael Steelman, MD, MFOMA

    Became a Master Fellow in 2015
    Master Fellow of OMA (MFOMA) is an honorary designation bestowed upon members whose contributions have exceeded those of a traditional member and whose leadership within the organization has elevated both the association and the field of obesity medicine.

    Dr. Steelman is a past president of the association. He is the recipient of the Dr. Raymond E. Dietz Meritorious Service Award in 2004 and the Obesity Medicine Clinician of the Year Award in 1993 and 2006.

  • Eric C. Westman, MD, MHS, MFOMA

    Eric C. Westman, MD, MHS, MFOMA

    Became a Master Fellow in 2015
    Master Fellow of OMA (MFOMA) is an honorary designation bestowed upon members whose contributions have exceeded those of a traditional member and whose leadership within the organization has elevated both the association and the field of obesity medicine.

    Dr. Westman is a past president of the association and the current ex officio on the Board of Trustees. He is the recipient of the Steelman-Seim Educator Award for Excellence in Academics in 2009 and the Obesity Medicine Clinician of the Year Award in 2010.

  • Gary Zisk, DO, MFOMA

    Gary Zisk, DO, MFOMA

    Became a Master Fellow in 2015
    Master Fellow of OMA (MFOMA) is an honorary designation bestowed upon members whose contributions have exceeded those of a traditional member and whose leadership within the organization has elevated both the association and the field of obesity medicine.

    Dr. Zisk is the recipient of the Dr. Raymond E. Dietz Meritorious Service Award in 1995 and the Obesity Medicine Clinician of the Year Award in 2003.

  • Lydia Alexander, MD, FOMA

    Lydia Alexander, MD, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2018

    Dr. Alexander began serving on the OMA Board of Trustees in 2017. She is also a member of the Membership Committee and has served as a mentor to a clinician new to the field through the conference mentorship program.

  • Harold Bays, MD, FTOS, FACC, FACE, FNLA, FOMA

    Harold Bays, MD, FTOS, FACC, FACE, FNLA, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2017

    Dr. Bays is the chairperson of the Obesity Algorithm Committee and an author of the Obesity Algorithm.

  • Gurpreet Boparai, MD, FOMA

    Gurpreet Boparai, MD, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2017

    Dr. Boparai serves on the Pediatric Committee.

  • Erin Chamberlin, MD, FAAFP, FOMA

    Erin Chamberlin, MD, FAAFP, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2017

    Dr. Chamberlin serves on the CME Overview Committee and Obesity Treatment Foundation Research Committee.

  • Sandra Christensen, MSN, ARNP, FOMA

    Sandra Christensen, MSN, ARNP, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2016

    Ms. Christensen serves on the CME Overview Committee and NP and PA Committee. She is a past chairperson of the NP and PA Committee.

    How long have you been working in obesity medicine and what is your current position? I've been practicing obesity medicine since 2005 and opened my own practice in 2009. I plan to add a second clinician within the next year.

    What do you enjoy most about practicing obesity medicine? I enjoy the process of utilizing evidence-based assessment and treatment strategies to solve the puzzle that each person's health and story presents. I also enjoy educating patients about the complexities of obesity and partnering with them to develop a personalized treatment plan. Witnessing their weight loss, improved health, and greater engagement with life stokes my passion to continue learning more about this complex disease.

    What excites you about the field of obesity medicine right now? I'm excited about the ever-increasing awareness that obesity is a complex disease worthy of specialized, comprehensive treatment. The body of science is growing and more treatment options are emerging. There are more medication options than ever before, as well as greater acceptance of their role. Collaboration among obesity organizations, and with other professional organizations, is increasing, and bright, passionate clinicians are flocking to our specialty. I'm especially excited about collaborative efforts to create a board certification for nurse practitioners and physician assistants.

    What do you find most valuable about your membership with OMA? It is an honor to rub shoulders with the finest clinicians and obesity leaders in the country, whether it is at a conference, on the members-only LinkedIn group, while serving on an OMA committee, or through mentoring clinicians new to the field. OMA provides clinical education and leadership opportunities that are second to none. I appreciate OMA's support of nurse practitioners and physician assistants and look forward to all clinicians having equal opportunity to lead and practice our specialty. We need an army of well-educated obesity medicine clinician leaders to change the landscape of healthcare!

    What are your favorite ways to spend your time off? Writing articles for my health blog, reading, painting, making mosaics, and gardening with my grandchildren, who delight in digging in the dirt as much as I do.

  • Suzanne Cuda, MD, FAAP, FOMA

    Suzanne Cuda, MD, FAAP, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2017

    Dr. Cuda serves on the Pediatric Committee and CME Overview Committee. She is a co-author of the Pediatric Obesity Algorithm and has presented about treating pediatric obesity at several OMA conferences.

  • Krishna Doniparthi, MD, FAARM, FOMA

    Krishna Doniparthi, MD, FAARM, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2016

    Dr. Doniparthi is a member of the Board of Trustees and serves on the Advocacy Committee, CME Overview Committee, Membership Committee, NP and PA Committee, and OTF Development Committee.

    How long have you been working in obesity medicine and what is your current position? I have been involved in obesity medicine for the past 11 years and directly with OMA for the past 7 years, and I am currently the medical director at my clinic in the Atlanta area.

    What do you enjoy most about practicing obesity medicine? I truly enjoy seeing the hope in patients' eyes when they start to lose weight, at a time when they thought they could never lose weight for the rest of their lives. Practicing obesity medicine has been intellectually fulfilling because I now see medicine in a whole new light: that being afflicted with obesity can create a multitude of other health problems. Solving the obesity problem allows for improved health as it relates to cancer, heart disease, auto-immune diseases and so many other conditions.

    What excites you about the field of obesity medicine right now? The most exciting aspect of obesity medicine is that we are on the cutting edge of an ever-expanding wealth of knowledge. I get excited about the relationship between epigenetics and the environment. When we choose to eat the right foods, we can help improve, prevent, or reverse epigenetic changes. That's simply amazing! No other field of medicine can say that.

    What do you find most valuable about your membership with OMA? I value the people I meet at every conference I attend, whether new or existing members. I haven't missed a conference since 2010! OMA has such genuinely interested clinicians that are happy to meet other people, become friends, and stay in touch even after the conference is over. I cannot say that this is the same at other organizational conferences I have attended. And we have such a great time while enhancing our medical knowledge with like-minded people.

    What are your favorite ways to spend your time off? I am a foodie, so I spend a lot of time in the kitchen. I am always trying to make new dishes for both family and friends. I love to entertain friends with foods that are both healthy and taste great. Spending time with the family is very important to me, and we make the time to take trips together. I recently brought a dog into our family, a Rhodesian ridgeback named Thor. When it's the right time of the season, you will find me cheering for the University of Alabama Crimson Tide football team, my residency alma mater. Although it has been a few years, I love to play the drums, but more frequently love to listen to a variety of music, take photographs, and occasionally play some computer games.

  • U. Inge Fergsuon, DO, FACOI, FOMA

    U. Inge Fergsuon, DO, FACOI, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2016

    Dr. Ferguson previously served on the Board of Trustees. She serves on the CME Overview Committee and presents at OMA's Obesity Medicine Basics courses and the Review Course for the ABOM Exam.

    How long have you been working in obesity medicine and what is your current position? I loved nutrition as an undergraduate but decided upon pathology instead. Obesity medicine is a perfect fit, allowing me to study and promote nutrition and other health habits. Working in primary care, I had a discussion with an RD regarding weight management, and my new career was born in 2004. My first OMA conference perfectly integrated my interests in lifestyle and health! I was hooked. I've practiced obesity medicine since 2005 and currently am a full-time MOVE Physician Champion at VA Southern Nevada, the VA's national weight management program.

    What do you enjoy most about practicing obesity medicine? With a pathology background, I understand disease well and have a strong interest in prevention. I also have a family and personal history of obesity. I understand my patients' frustrations. My role is to aid in removing obstructions and start them on a path. If that path doesn't work, we try another, sometimes with the aid of anti-obesity medications or surgery. I consider myself practicing "reverse medicine," thinking of real food, activity, and sleep to maximize self-care and minimize medical intervention. Obesity medicine allows me to apply science to clinical care and get results!

    What excites you about the field of obesity medicine right now? Applied biochemistry! Patient outcomes! I love teaching veterans, mostly men, how to self-care with lifestyle. Facilitating small groups provides education, socialization, and support. Seeing veterans' joy at finally reducing their own disease burden (especially obesity and diabetes) and recovering their lives. I would like to see more research in regards to lacking self-control with food, be it food addiction, orexigenic food additives, or other. I see former marines and military officers who can combat tobacco and drug addictions but struggle to combat their weight. I'd also like to see research on ketosis in PTSD, TBI, dementia, and pain. I believe this would truly benefit veterans.

    What do you find most valuable about your membership with OMA? Clinical science and clinical experts that have helped me to help others. Through OMA I've been encouraged to apply nutrition, body composition, anti-obesity medications, and research. In addition, I've had the opportunity to advocate for obesity medicine. If we make enough noise, public health policy makers and insurers will hear us.

    What are your favorite ways to spend your time off? I Iove exploring outdoors, especially hunting animals with my camera, national parks, and ghost towns. I de-stress by gardening, painting, reading novels, or playing Bingo (I do live in Vegas).

  • Angela Fitch, MD, FACP, FOMA

    Angela Fitch, MD, FACP, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2017

    Dr. Fitch is the secretary/treasurer on the Board of Trustees and has served on the Marketing-Communication Committee and the Exhibitor/Advertiser Review Committee.

    How long have you been working in obesity medicine and what is your current position? I have been practicing obesity medicine full time for the past six years. Before that I practiced pediatric obesity part time for four years and integrated obesity treatment into my internal medicine/pediatric primary care practice. I was certified in obesity medicine during the first sitting of the ABOM exam in 2012. Currently, I am the medical director of a multidisciplinary Medical Weight Management Center at the University of Cincinnati. I am also the medical director of our Executive Health and Wellness program. I am an associate professor in the departments of internal medicine, surgery, and integrative medicine.

    What do you enjoy most about practicing obesity medicine? I enjoy helping patients reach their goals. It is so enjoyable to help them figure out what their weight management "why" is and guiding them to lifelong personalized health and behavior changes for optimal wellness.

    What excites you about the field of obesity medicine right now? I am very excited about all the new ways we are finding to help patients on their journey. I have a passion for telemedicine opportunities, new medications and combinations of medications, as well as integrative approaches and the gut microbiome.

    What do you find most valuable about your membership with OMA? Connecting with other obesity medicine specialists is why I find the OMA so valuable. Sharing ideas and learning from the entire community, as well as OMA's educational opportunities, are more than worth my membership dues! I will be a lifelong member, and I enjoy having the honor of serving on the OMA Board of Trustees and giving back to our organization.

    What are your favorite ways to spend your time off? I enjoy spending quality time with family and friends, any outdoor activity (skiing, hiking, mountain biking), exercising, and cooking.

  • Michelle Freshwater, MD, FOMA

    Michelle Freshwater, MD, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2018

    Dr. Freshwater serves on the Advocacy Committee. She has also been a mentor to a clinician new to the field through the conference mentorship program.

    How long have you been working in obesity medicine and what is your current position? I have been working in obesity medicine full-time for 13 years and I have recently had the opportunity to purchase the practice that I have been at since the start. As a clinic owner, I am enjoying the continued challenges in practicing along with new opportunities to develop my leadership and business skills.

    What do you enjoy most about practicing obesity medicine? My background is family medicine. I find obesity medicine allows me to practice many of the skills I was already using, while now I get to help resolve the problems with which patients present. Nothing is more rewarding than helping people lead active, healthy lives and stopping chronic medications is almost as exciting for me as it is for my patients.

    What excites you about the field of obesity medicine right now? I am excited about the momentum around interest in nutrition. People from all walks of life are curious about eating right and research increasingly supports what we teach our patients about healthy eating. I am encouraged that a real sea-change is happening in our society and culture that is going to improve the nutritional environment.

    What do you find most valuable about your membership with OMA? My OMA membership has been most valuable in exposing me to a wealth of knowledge. Other members are always willing to share their experience and expertise. The OMA educational resources (conferences, recordings, webinars, patient handouts) are easily accessible and worth far more than the monetary costs. And the opportunities to get involved are numerous. I highly recommend finding ways to serve in the OMA as a way of expanding your obesity medicine education. I recently completed 2 years on the Advocacy Committee and look forward to my next OMA adventure.

    What are your favorite ways to spend your time off? My time away from medicine is spent with some very active boys. My oldest son is in kindergarten and his younger brother is in preschool. I love cooking healthy meals for my family when I am not refereeing impromptu wrestling matches, attending soccer games, or sending someone to timeout. I hope to morph these activities into my previous loves of skiing, camping, and hiking. I also have some lovely knitting needles that I look at longingly from time to time.

  • Brent Gear, DO, FACEP, FACOEP, FOMA

    Brent Gear, DO, FACEP, FACOEP, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2018

    Dr. Gear has served on the CME, Pediatric, and Medical School Curriculum Committees. He has also presented at an OMA conference and been a mentor to a clinician new to the field through the conference mentorship program.

  • Frank Greenway, MD, FOMA

    Frank Greenway, MD, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2018

    Dr. Greenway is the president of the Obesity Treatment Foundation Board of Directors. He has also been a speaker on the topic of medication at OMA conferences.

  • Sarah Hallberg, DO, MS, FOMA

    Sarah Hallberg, DO, MS, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2017

    Dr. Hallberg serves on the CME Committee. She has also been a mentor to a clinician new to the field through the conference mentorship program and is a regular presenter during the Review Course for the ABOM Exam.

    How long have you been working in obesity medicine and what is your current position? I have been working in obesity medicine for over five years, and I am currently a medical director at Virta Health and the medical director and founder of the Medically Supervised Weight Loss Program at Indiana University Health Arnett.

    What do you enjoy most about practicing obesity medicine? I enjoy sharing the journey. Being able to partner with your patients on a lifestyle-change journey is an incredible honor. I get to share in the victories and struggles and watch as their quality of life improves.

    What excites you about the field of obesity medicine right now? We are seeing more and more steps to true nutrition reform and this is incredibly exciting. Nutrition recommendations have failed the public for decades, and I really think the tide is turning. This will help support the field of obesity medicine.

    What do you find most valuable about your membership with OMA? I enjoy the interaction with colleagues. Going to the conferences and meeting others in the field is such a great way to share ideas, and I always walk away with ideas for improved patient care.

    What are your favorite ways to spend your time off? Anything that involves hiking. Our family loves to travel, and we are always looking for the next great trail to explore. We have seen so many beautiful places, but my favorite so far is Zion National Park.

  • Robert Huster, MD, FACOG, FOMA

    Robert Huster, MD, FACOG, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2017

    Dr. Huster serves on the Advocacy Committee and has represented OMA several times during advocacy visits to Capitol Hill.

    How long have you been working in obesity medicine and what is your current position? I integrated obesity medicine into my Ob-Gyn practice after meeting and talking with Dr. Hal Seim at the fall meeting of the (then) ASBP in 1995. Discontinuing obstetrics initially and later major gynecologic surgery, this January marked the 20th anniversary of my start in obesity medicine. It now comprises easily ninety percent of my solo clinical practice in Liberty, Missouri, just outside of Kansas City. Following my certification by the American Board of Bariatric Medicine in 1996, I was honored to be named a director of that board. I served as the chair of that board from 1997-1999 as it established itself as a separate corporate entity. I returned to the ABBM as a director in January 2008 and then participated in the formation of the current American Board of Obesity Medicine in 2011, where I currently serve as a director.

    What do you enjoy most about practicing obesity medicine? I have the unique experience, as many in our field do, of looking forward every day to the opportunity to assist my patients in not only markedly improving their health but also significantly impacting the quality of their lives. The sincere words of appreciation I hear every day and the changes I see in my patient's lives remind me constantly of the days when I handed a healthy newborn baby to an excited mother and father.

    What excites you about the field of obesity medicine right now? The emergence of obesity medicine as its own entity and recognition as such by our peers is truly exciting. Through the dedicated input from OMA, the statement by the AMA recognizing obesity as a disease is a huge milestone. Certification through the ABOM has become more vigorous. Through cooperation with the National Board of Medical Examiners, the exam is not only psychometrically valid but continues to improve and test those areas of knowledge considered critical for the certified practicing obesity medicine physician.

    What do you find most valuable about your membership with OMA? The openness of our members to share their experiences and expertise with others makes our association very unique. Every conference I have attended since 1995 has provided me with new ideas and approaches that I have integrated into my daily practice. I have participated in both the CME and advocacy committees in the past. The opportunity to become active in those and others is always open and encouraged for our members.

    What are your favorite ways to spend your time off? Since they are now young adults, my free time has shifted from participation as a local leader in my sons' Scouting programs to enjoying life as a grandfather to my two grandchildren. To avoid any chance of boredom, our 13-week-old puppy keeps life interesting. When their practice allows it, I would strongly recommend members to make the move to a four-day workweek. Three-day weekends are wonderful!

  • Susan Isensee, MD, FAAFP, FOMA

    Susan Isensee, MD, FAAFP, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2016

    Dr. Isensee serves on the Advocacy Committee and previously served on the Medical School Curriculum Committee.

    How long have you been working in obesity medicine and what is your current position? I have done obesity medicine informally since 2003. In 2005 my multi-specialty medical group decided to formally develop a comprehensive weight management program. I was the clinical director along with one surgeon, and we worked closely with administration to set up all the programs. We also worked closely with our own HMO to get full coverage for our employees in 2007-08 and many other local businesses. When I became a physician I had no idea I would become an insurance expert! I went from practicing 25% obesity medicine and 75% FP in 2005 to 50% in 2008 and full-time obesity medicine in 2011. I stepped down as clinical director from our program three years ago and recently retired after 31 years to spend more time with my family, medical school commitments, and possibly pursue more with UW Madison in the fall.

    What do you enjoy most about practicing obesity medicine? I see obesity medicine as I did family medicine, establishing a long-term relationship with patients and their friends and families. I enjoy helping patients realize this is a chronic disease and explain some of what we know about the hormones and chemicals that contribute to this being a disease. They are so grateful we are not biased against them and are here to help them get their lives and health back. It is privilege to care for them and help them on this lifelong journey with our team of health care professionals. I also enjoy educating health care professionals and patients about this disease and what we are doing to treat it. I love public speaking and have given many talks about obesity to countless patient groups, health care providers, local hospitals, insurance companies, nurse reviewers, politicians, and more.

    What excites you about the field of obesity medicine right now? I think the new research on the disease aspect of obesity is fascinating. I also think the push to include more education to students in medical fields is important. As president of the Wisconsin Medical Alumni Association and living in Madison where the UW School of Medicine and Public Health is located, I have had several opportunities to speak to and interact with medical students. Their interest in obesity medicine is very keen.

    What do you find most valuable about your membership with OMA? My membership has connected me with some of the best and brightest clinicians and researchers in this field. The educational events gave me the skills to better help my patients and educate others in the causes and treatment of obesity. I've enjoyed the advocacy committee and meeting with representatives from Wisconsin and other states on Capital Hill. The social interactions with other providers in this field have been priceless.

    What are your favorite ways to spend your time off? I love to read and fish. We have a home in Northern Wisconsin near Minocqua on a lake. There we also spend time entertaining friends and family. My husband and I enjoy gourmet cooking and collecting and drinking fine wine (yes, I have a cellar). I have two dogs and two grown children. I love watching sports, especially football,(Badgers and Packers) basketball, and soccer. I regularly exercise using my Wii fit, medicine ball, elliptical, recumbent bike, and walking my dogs.

  • Michelle A. Kennedy, NP-C, FOMA

    Michelle A. Kennedy, NP-C, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2017

    Mrs. Kennedy serves on the Membership Committee and the NP and PA Committee.

  • Carl Knopke, MD, FOMA

    Carl Knopke, MD, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2017

    Dr. Knopke is a former member of the Board of Trustees and serves on the CME Planning Committee and CME Overview Committee. He previously served on the Membership Committee, Advocacy Committee, Policy Committee, and Exhibitor Review Committee.

  • Scot Kolsin, MD, FOMA

    Scot Kolsin, MD, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2017

    Dr. Kolsin serves on the Advocacy Committee and Pediatric Committee. He has also been a mentor to a clinician new to the field through the conference mentorship program.

  • Cesar Lara, MD, FOMA

    Cesar Lara, MD, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2016

    Dr. Lara previously served on the Marketing-Communication Committee. He has also been a mentor to a clinician new to the field through the conference mentorship program.

    How long have you been working in obesity medicine and what is your current position? I have been practicing obesity medicine for over 15 years. I am the founder and CEO of Cesar A. Lara MD Center for Weight Management with four different locations throughout the Tampa Bay area. Today, our centers help thousands of people each year through weight management and age management programs. Based on an integrative and preventative care model, we utilize the best in obesity medicine, nutrition, bioidentical hormone therapy, and lifestyle modification.

    What do you enjoy most about practicing obesity medicine? Originally trained and certified as a family physician, I have always been motivated to change and empower my patients. Although I developed and thrived a successful primary care practice 15 years ago, I recognized that I was just putting Band-Aids on most conditions. The pharmaceutical companies loved me but I wasn't really healing my patients. Far too often, I noticed my patients becoming dependent on different medications, and while they provided some benefit, they came with other problems and costs I could no longer support. I knew I needed to find a better way to heal my patients. Today, I enjoy helping my patients regain control of their health. By helping my patients overcome obesity, I not only am able to empower them with an understanding of their health, but I am also able to prevent and often reverse a lot of chronic conditions. For example, I have helped hundreds of patients with type 2 diabetes get off insulin and other medications through my comprehensive weight loss programs. It's amazing to see just how well the body functions when you focus on health instead of diagnosis.

    What excites you about the field of obesity medicine right now? It is continually evolving. As the scientific community continues to pay more attention to obesity, new findings are always connecting the dots of health in new ways. For me, I'm really excited about discovering new ways we can empower our body through the power of the mind and the implications of neuroplasticity.

    What do you find most valuable about your membership with OMA? What I have enjoyed and continue to enjoy is the supportive relationships I have developed over the years with like-minded colleagues and the comprehensive and up-to-date CME courses. I love having the opportunity to come together as an organization and focus on changing the mindset of our medical society when it comes to understanding and treating obesity. Through those efforts, obesity is now considered a chronic medical condition and the idea to just eat less and exercise is no longer relevant.

    What are your favorite ways to spend your time off? I enjoy jogging and training for marathons, dancing, boating, skiing, spending time with family and friends, and philosophizing over a glass of wine or two.

  • Ethan Lazarus, MD, FOMA

    Ethan Lazarus, MD, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2017

    Dr. Lazarus is the vice president on the Board of Trustees and serves on the Advocacy Committee, Policy Committee, and Investment Committee. He also serves as OMA's delegate in the American Medical Association House of Delegates. Dr. Lazarus is a regular presenter during the Review Course for the ABOM Exam and frequently presents on the topic of nutrition at conferences.

    How long have you been working in obesity medicine and what is your current position? After completing a residency in family medicine in 1999, I practiced in an outpatient clinic for five years. During this time, the best-known doctor practicing obesity medicine in Denver was Dr. Jim Berry. I rotated with him for a month, and he suggested I look at OMA (then it was ASBP). I attended my first conference in 2003. In 2004, I took over the clinic and became the sole physician. At the time I took over, I had a full front office staff, six RDs and a psychotherapist. We saw roughly 30 new patients a month, and about 1,000 follow-up visits per month, so I hit the ground running! We built and moved to a new center two and a half years ago, and the clinic continues to thrive.

    What do you enjoy most about practicing obesity medicine? My favorite part is that I get to spend a lot of time with my patients and don't spend any time dealing with the hassles so common in medicine these days. My new patient visits are a full hour, and follow-ups are a full half-hour. Initially, patients see me about once a month (patients attend weekly visits with their dietitian between my visits), and long-term patients usually see me about every third month (with monthly visits with the dietitian in-between their visits with me).

    Patients are incredibly grateful that we treat obesity with care, compassion, confidentiality and respect -- the same as any other medical problem. Most patients have been mistreated by other healthcare providers. Patients who find me have already tried many other commercialized programs and often feel they are doomed to be heavy. When we offer intensive behavioral therapy, structured food plans and specialist medical management, they usually do great and achieve medically meaningful weight loss. This almost always leads to not only improvements in health, but to significant improvements in the quality of life. Patients get happier and healthier! What's not to like about that?

    I have also enjoyed my blossoming speaking career. I love teaching other healthcare providers about caring for obesity. I also teach free classes for my patients that have been a big hit.

    What excites you about the field of obesity medicine right now? I see obesity medicine as an emerging specialty and am hopeful that we will have recognition as a formal medical specialty in the coming years. As we gain this added respect, I hope it will spill out to the general medical community that obesity is treatable, and that we shouldn't tell our patients to avoid evidence-based treatments, like intensive behavioral therapy, anti-obesity medications, structured food plans or surgery. I still worry that most healthcare providers do not counsel properly about obesity and tell patients to use tools that those of us in obesity medicine know don't work. I also worry that most individuals working on losing weight are treated as if obesity is not a disease. They go to commercialized programs or order do-it-yourself diets delivered to their door. Obesity is a disease and deserves to be managed as such by a healthcare provider with proper training.

    What do you find most valuable about your membership with OMA? I became OMA's delegate in the American Medical Association (AMA) House of Delegates in 2013, and at my first meeting representing us, was able to help pass the resolution recognizing obesity as a disease. By bringing this to the forefront of the discussion, the language around obesity at the AMA has changed. Now, every resolution the AMA has considered regarding obesity has been discussed with the same respect as resolutions about other serious diseases. The AMA has demonstrated an interest in improving health outcomes with regards to obesity. We have passed resolutions calling for improved access to evidence-based services, we got the AMA to endorse the Treat and Reduce Obesity Act, and most recently, passed policy aimed at reducing weight bias.

    Since 2013, I have served on the OMA board as a trustee, secretary/treasurer, and now as the vice president. I have participated in developing our strategic plan, interact with other board members almost every day, and have gotten to know a network of respected obesity medicine specialists across the country. When I started in obesity medicine, I felt like I was the only one doing it! Now, it brings me joy and comfort to know so many other highly respected healthcare providers have dedicated their careers to this.

    I love representing us to the greater medical community. But I also love attending our conferences and meeting all of our OMA members at different stages of their career. At every conference, I see old friends, make new ones, and help people just thinking about getting into obesity medicine, and I learn from peers that have been doing this for a long time. My practice is so much better because of all of these friendships.

    What are your favorite ways to spend your time off? The OMA board would probably joke that I spend all my time off sending them emails with ideas, trying to get everybody to speak up for advocacy or trying to make OMA better. Believe it or not, I do actually have other activities outside of OMA. I am happily married and have three small children ages 11, 8 and 3. I feel blessed to have such a loving wife and great kids. We love the Colorado outdoors. I am a semi-professional cellist, perform in an orchestra, and love arranging and performing music. And, I love computers; I created a customized EHR that runs my busy practice. Hardly a day goes by where I'm not tweaking something, adding a new report or a new feature.

  • Richard Lindquist, MD, FAASP, FOMA

    Richard Lindquist, MD, FAASP, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2016

    Dr. Lindquist is a member of the Obesity Treatment Foundation's (OTF) Board of Directors and a previous member of the Obesity Medicine Association's Board of Trustees. He serves on the OTF Research Committee and the OTF Development Committee and frequently presents at conferences.

  • Pamela Lyon, MD, FACEP, FOMA

    Pamela Lyon, MD, FACEP, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2017

    Dr. Lyon serves on the Advocacy Committee. She has also been a mentor to a clinician new to the field through the conference mentorship program.

  • William McCarthy, MD, FOMA

    William McCarthy, MD, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2016

    Dr. McCarthy is the CME Program Director for OMA. He also serves on the CME Planning Committee, CME Overview Committee, and Pediatric Committee.

    How long have you been working in obesity medicine and what is your current position? I have been a full time solo practitioner of obesity medicine since 2007. In addition to my medical practice, I serve as the CME program director for OMA.

    What do you enjoy most about practicing obesity medicine? After 30 years as a family practitioner, I was burned out and on the verge of abandoning my medical career. Obesity medicine has proven that I can really make a difference in the lives of my patients and has given me a new life as a physician.

    What excites you about the field of obesity medicine right now? Not long ago, obesity medicine was considered a fringe specialty; now we're mainstream. It's exciting to be part of the cutting edge of an entirely new field of medicine.

    What do you find most valuable about your membership with OMA? I joined OMA (then ASBP) in 2005. The educational content, the organizational leadership, and the camaraderie of the members convinced me that I wanted to practice obesity medicine. The organization continues to get better by the year.

    What are your favorite ways to spend your time off? I'm mostly a homebody and enjoy spending time with my wife, who's been my best friend for over fifty years.

  • Jeremy McConnell, MD, FOMA

    Jeremy McConnell, MD, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2017

    Dr. McConnell has previously served on the CME Committee and has presented on the topic of insurance coding at conferences.

  • Julia Melamed, MD, FOMA

    Julia Melamed, MD, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2016

    Dr. Melamed previously served on the Marketing-Communication Committee. She has also been a mentor to a clinician new to the field through the conference mentorship program.

  • Daisy Merey, MD, PhD, FAAFP, FOMA

    Daisy Merey, MD, PhD, FAAFP, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2018

    Dr. Merey has been a member of OMA for more than 35 years. She served on the Marketing Committee.

  • Doris Munoz-Mantilla, MD, FOMA

    Doris Munoz-Mantilla, MD, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2017

    Dr. Munoz-Mantilla is the chairperson of the Membership Committee. She has also been a mentor to a clinician new to the field through the conference mentorship program.

  • Derek Muse, MD, FOMA

    Derek Muse, MD, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2016

    Dr. Muse has previously served on an OMA committee and has been a mentor to a clinician new to the field through the conference mentorship program.

  • Joynita Nicholson, DO, FOMA

    Joynita Nicholson, DO, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2018

    Dr. Nicholson has served on the Advocacy and Membership Committees. She has also been a mentor to a clinician new to the field through the conference mentorship program.

    How long have you been working in obesity medicine and what is your current position? My work in obesity medicine began my sophomore year of college as a Yarborough Grant Recipient for student research at Elizabeth City State University. I worked in the lab of my botany professor and presented a poster about a comparative analysis of hypocotyl protein concentration of the main ingredient found in over-the-counter weight loss medication Cal Ban 3000, Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (guar) black-coated seeds and gray-coated seeds using SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. During my years as an Ohio University College of Osteopathic Medicine Center of Excellence Research Fellow, I presented “Obesity and the African-American Population” and introduced the concept of excess weight being an issue that mandated more attention to truly treat the root of disease. By residency, I found a bariatrician in the yellow pages who allowed me to spend a month of my clinical rotations with him. I have been practicing obesity medicine since 2006. I am currently the first of 600 Bon Secours-Richmond physicians to become board-certified in obesity medicine and now also the first to receive this most distinguished honor of becoming an OMA Fellow. During my 13-year tenure, I have pioneered our organization to start our Medically Supervised Weight Loss Program, which has expanded to three busy locations. I am also the lead physician at Brook Run Family Physicians.

    What do you enjoy most about practicing obesity medicine? Practicing obesity medicine helps me enhance my compassionate, empathetic patient care rooted in osteopathic philosophy. Both emphasize a more holistic and preventative approach while addressing the cause of disease. I enjoy sharing the jollity of the life-changing experiences patients have after losing weight, like stopping insulin after 20 years of use and maintaining A1c below 6. Watching 400-pound patients wear jackets not worn since 8th grade! Sharing tears of joy instead of tears of pain with patients who have implemented our proposed lifestyle changes and are ecstatically seeing manifestations of their efforts change their lives for the better!

    What excites you about the field of obesity medicine right now? The exponential growth in publishing obesity-centric articles and presenting evidence-based research to better inform and equip providers with tools to improve the quality, value, and extent of our patient care. Watching the exponential growth in the number of physicians who are earning board certification in obesity medicine is exciting! Hopefully before long we will not only have a healthier America, but we will have a stronger unified voice to advocate louder and more effectively for insurance coverage of obesity medicine services and medications.

    What do you find most valuable about your membership with OMA? My membership with OMA began fall 2011. Since joining OMA, I have found tremendous value in the much needed, burnout-preventing “new birth” of my passion for medicine that results from the pearls of new knowledge and growing network of life long friends I gain at each OMA conference. During my impressionable infancy years of membership, I greatly appreciated and valued the tangible visibility of the leadership who were eager to share their experiences and expertise and kindly answered my MANY questions. Now, I value opportunities to do the same.

    What are your favorite ways to spend your time off? My favorite way to spend time off is being fully present with my wonderful husband (Lorenzo) and my three incredible sons (Ian, 11, Joel, 9, and Jace, 8), our extended families, and friends. I especially enjoy being the most rowdy cheerleader for these future NBA and NFL players as we travel across the states for AAU basketball and across the city for recreational league football, track, soccer, and lacrosse. Go Joyzboyz!

  • Nicholas Pennings, DO, FOMA

    Nicholas Pennings, DO, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2017

    Dr. Pennings serves on the CME Committee and the steering committee of the Obesity Medicine Education Collaborative. He is a former member of the Board of Trustees and has previously served on the Exhibitor/Advertiser Review Committee, Marketing-Communication Committee, and Membership Committee. Dr. Pennings has also been a mentor to a clinician new to the field through the conference mentorship program and is a regular presenter at conferences.

    How long have you been working in obesity medicine and what is your current position? My focus on treating obesity began in 2008. Seeing my patients continuing to gain weight and develop obesity-related health complications frustrated me as a clinician. I initiated a comprehensive weight loss program in my office, and I was amazed how effective weight loss was at improving my patients' health and reducing their need for medications. At the time, I was in private practice in New York with a dream of going into academic medicine. Success in treating patients with obesity provided a pathway for me to leave my practice and pursue teaching medical students. Currently, I am the Chair of Family Medicine at Campbell University School of Osteopathic Medicine in North Carolina, where I have been able to incorporate obesity medicine into the curriculum.

    What do you enjoy most about practicing obesity medicine? In my experience, the two happiest events in medicine are delivering a healthy baby and helping a patient get to a healthy weight. Patients with obesity have struggled with their weight for years, sometimes even their whole life. They often feel helpless and hopeless. Helping them lose weight, reduce medications and gain control of their long-term challenges is very rewarding. The joy patients experience and the gratitude they express makes practicing obesity medicine a pleasure.

    What excites you about the field of obesity medicine right now? I am excited about the opportunities that lie ahead. We are in the infancy stage of understanding the drivers behind obesity and the treatment options. Knowledge in this field is growing rapidly, and I am convinced that great treatment options are in our future. The OMA has been leading the way by creating excellent opportunities for all health care providers to learn how to integrate advances in obesity medicine with treating the patient with obesity. I am excited to be part of this emerging field of medicine and a part of the OMA.

    What do you find most valuable about your membership with OMA? What I find most valuable is the peer-to-peer education and fellowship, which provides great opportunities for sharing and learning about obesity medicine. As the field of obesity medicine evolves, collaboration with experienced health professionals at conferences and via LinkedIn and email is essential to grow and improve the specialty. Through my connections at OMA, I have greatly improved my knowledge and skills as an obesity medicine specialist. In addition, providers that practice obesity medicine enjoy what they do. It is always a pleasure to work with and learn from my obesity medicine colleagues.

    What are your favorite ways to spend your time off? When you enjoy what you do, you are never working. However, during my free time, I enjoy traveling and spending time with my wife, Carol, and our five children and an occasional round of golf.

  • Warren Peters, MD, MPH, FOMA

    Warren Peters, MD, MPH, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2018

    Dr. Peters is a former member of the Obesity Treatment Foundation Board of Directors, where he served as Secretary/Treasurer. He also served on the Medical School Curriculum Committee.

  • Craig Primack, MD, FACP, FAAP, FOMA

    Craig Primack, MD, FACP, FAAP, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2016

    Dr. Primack is the president-elect on the Board of Trustees. He serves on the Obesity Algorithm Committee and the Corporate Advisory Council.

    How long have you been working in obesity medicine and what is your current position? I have been a full-time obesity medicine physician since 2006. My clinic has grown from two full-time physicians to five full-time physicians with four locations in the Phoenix area. We are less than a 20-minute drive for the majority of patients in the Phoenix area.

    What do you enjoy most about practicing obesity medicine? Of course it's the patients. We see our patients quite regularly. We see them every other week for the first 4-5 months and then usually monthly after that. When there are problems, we talk about weight, exercise, diet, and sleep, and when everything is going well, we are able to talk about other things.

    What excites you about the field of obesity medicine right now? Over the last few years, we have come a long way in drug choices for obesity management. Think about blood pressure. There are about 140 choices of medicines to use. In obesity care, we have less than 10 to treat about 35% of our society that has obesity and unfortunately, most of the medicines are not covered by insurance. We have a long way to go in that area.

    What do you find most valuable about your membership with OMA? When I found the OMA, I found my home. Before my first meeting, I had no idea that you could specialize in obesity medicine, that physicians practiced it as a career. Within one year of my first OMA meeting, I took the leap of faith and gave up primary care. About six years ago, I became a member of the board of trustees of the OMA and currently serve as the vice president. I have met a lot of wonderful and passionate people involved in the care of patients with obesity in the last 12 years.

    What are your favorite ways to spend your time off? First and foremost, I have three kids, which takes a lot of my free time. I am also an avid runner and cyclist.

  • Justin Puckett, DO, FOMA

    Justin Puckett, DO, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2017

    Dr. Puckett previously served on the Outreach Committee.

  • Vivienne Rose, MD, FOMA

    Vivienne Rose, MD, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2017

    Dr. Rose serves on the Pediatric Committee.

  • Wendy Scinta, MD, MS, FOMA

    Wendy Scinta, MD, MS, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2017

    Dr. Scinta is the president of OMA and serves on the Pediatric Committee.

  • Jennifer Seger, MD, FOMA

    Jennifer Seger, MD, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2016

    Dr. Seger previously served on the Board of Trustees. She serves on the Membership Committee, Obesity Algorithm Committee, and Organizational Outreach Committee and is a past chairperson of the Membership Committee.

  • Bharti Shetye, MD, FOMA

    Bharti Shetye, MD, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2017

    Dr. Shetye serves on the Pediatric Committee. In 2014, Dr. Shetye won the Obesity Treatment Foundation's poster contest for her poster titled, "Obesity Clinic for the Uninsured/Low-income Population."

    How long have you been working in obesity medicine and what is your current position? Eleven beautiful years, since 2006. I started my career track in the bariatric field at a commercial weight loss clinic and was not impressed by their "one shoe fits all" approach. I soon got certified as an obesity medicine physician by the ABBM in 2007/8. Thereafter, I started a weight management clinic with the Florida Department of Health in Pinellas County, FL, which received national recognition as a model clinic for successful results by the National Association of City and County Health Officials in Washington, DC. I currently work as the medical director of Suncoast Bariatrics, a bariatric surgical clinic linked with a bariatric center of excellence in St. Petersburg, FL. In addition, I also own and see patients in my own private medical weight loss clinic, Dr. Abby's Weight Management Clinic in Tampa, FL.

    What do you enjoy most about practicing obesity medicine? Happy patients with improving health. Weight loss translates into improvement in physical and mental health, which in turn translates into improved patient relationships with family, friends, and coworkers; improved productivity at work; and general well being. The goal of every medical practice, every physician.

    What excites you about the field of obesity medicine right now? Obesity is a complex disease. Advances in the basic sciences, medical management, FDA approval of anti-obesity prescription medicines, insurance coverage for surgical interventions for obesity treatment - all successful efforts on multiple fronts to dent the obesity epidemic trajectory.

    What do you find most valuable about your membership with OMA?
    - Collaborations and networking opportunities with like-minded professionals
    - Education / CME opportunities
    - Access to online resources
    - Obesity Medicine e-Weekly newsletter
    - Research updates
    - Working with colleagues on committees and creating a positive impact in the bariatric world... and so much more!

    What are your favorite ways to spend your time off? Spending time with my three beautiful children is my ideal "day off." My time spent at the gym/fitness center(s) and traveling back home to India to spend time with extended family is therapeutic. Learning to dance has been on my wish list for a long time now -- I will get to it in the near future.

  • Jeffrey Sicat, MD, FACE, FOMA

    Jeffrey Sicat, MD, FACE, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2018

    Dr. Sicat began serving on the OMA Board of Trustees in 2016. He has also served on the CME, Marketing, and Organizational Outreach Committees and is a regular presenter during OMA's Review Course for the ABOM Exam.

  • Wickham Simonds, MD, FOMA

    Wickham Simonds, MD, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2016

    Dr. Simonds is a member of the Board of Trustees and is the former chairperson of the Membership Committee. He has also been a mentor to a clinician new to the field through the conference mentorship program.

    How long have you been working in obesity medicine and what is your current position? I have been practicing obesity medicine for 13 years. I am the owner of Doctor Simonds Weight Loss in Durham, North Carolina.

    What do you enjoy most about practicing obesity medicine? The thing that I enjoy most about practicing obesity medicine is that the therapies I prescribe actually correct multiple problems. I can work on reducing a patient's weight and at the same time see multiple other medical problems correct themselves.

    What excites you about the field of obesity medicine right now? Obesity medicine is evolving. New scientific discoveries, new medications, and new therapies are the rule rather than the exception. This makes practicing obesity medicine exciting now, and it has me excited about the future.

    What do you find most valuable about your membership with OMA? OMA membership provides a great opportunity to network with other obesity medicine providers. OMA's obesity medicine education is the best in the world. Finally, OMA provides opportunities to serve. I have served on two committees, served as a mentor, hosted "dine-arounds," served as a topic expert, and served in various capacities during events at OMA conferences.

    What are your favorite ways to spend your time off? I live in North Carolina, and my wife Anna and I own a small cottage at the beach. I love spending time off with my wife at the coast. Whether it's golfing, hanging out on the beach, going out for seafood, or boating, it's all a lot of fun.

  • Verlyn Warrington, MD, FOMA

    Verlyn Warrington, MD, FOMA

    Became a Fellow in 2016

    Dr. Warrington previously served on the Pediatric Committee and the Medical School Curriculum Committee. She has also been a mentor to a clinician new to the field through the conference mentorship program.